Pros and Cons of T-Mobile Phone Insurance

There’s no disputing the benefits of insurance when it comes to smartphones. However, not all insurance policies are the same, and levels of coverage vary from one provider to another. Two popular plans are Device Protection and Protection 360 from T-Mobile.
Although popular, T-Mobile phone insurance packages are pricey. Both Protection 360 and Device Protection plans come with a number of limitations, too. With that in mind, here’s a closer look at the pros and cons of choosing either policy when it comes to protecting your smartphone.

T-Mobile Phone Insurance Pros

#1. Online Claims

Whether buyers choose Device Protection or Protection 360 from T-Mobile, making a claim is straightforward. T-Mobile’s insurance underwriter, Asurion, provides a dedicated claims website. Asurion also provides insurance packages for Verizon customers and shoppers at big-box retail stores, including Walmart, Staples, and Home Depot.

#2. Extensive Coverage

T-Mobile phone insurance is generally comprehensive. The company promises protection against mechanical breakdowns, accidental damage, loss, and theft. Accidental damage protection is especially valuable, covering unfortunate mishaps such as liquid spills and submersion. Mechanical breakdown coverage, meanwhile, includes things like faulty screens or keypads.

#3. AppleCare Services Included

iPhone owners will be pleased to hear that T-Mobile phone insurance includes access to Apple’s valuable AppleCare services. However, this level of coverage is only available via upgraded Protection 360 plans. That means customers who opt for T-Mobile’s Device Protection only won’t receive this added benefit, even if they own an iPhone.

#4. McAfee Security and JUMP! Upgrades

In addition to AppleCare, Protection 360 buyers also get McAfee Security and JUMP! upgrades included. Buyers will receive McAfee Security for T-Mobile with ID Theft Protection, provided at no extra cost by McAfee. JUMP! upgrades, on the other hand, are part of an existing T-Mobile product that allows customers to lease a smartphone for zero to little down with low monthly payments.
However, neither AppleCare services nor McAfee Security and JUMP! upgrades are included with Device Protection only. These benefits are exclusively available to Protection 360 customers.

T-Mobile Phone Insurance Cons

#1. Varying Service Fees and Deductibles

Among the most significant drawbacks of any T-Mobile phone insurance package are the company’s varying service fees and deductibles. It’s not until a customer needs to make a claim that they’ll find out what they owe. T-Mobile reports that the system will calculate a price once a claim is filed and approved.
The exact amount a customer must contribute toward repair or replacement costs will be based on their device and the type of claim. Unfortunately, what this means is that it’s impossible to budget for such eventualities. According to Consumer Reports, this could be anywhere from $29 to $225.

#2. Replacement Smartphones May Not Be New

A major selling point of both Protection 360 and Device Protection plans from T-Mobile is that a smartphone will be replaced if it’s too badly damaged to be repaired. Yet, despite having to pay a potential deductible of up to $225 for the privilege, the replacement phone that a customer receives may not be a new one.
T-Mobile’s insurance underwriter, Asurion, routinely refurbishes used smartphones and issues these as replacements rather than delivering new devices.

#3. Claims Limited to Three per Year

Another drawback of Device Protection and Protection 360 coverage is T-Mobile’s limit of three claims per year. While this is one year more than AT&T provides, it’s still an important consideration.
By contrast, the likes of SquareTrade allow four claims per year, while Upsie permits unlimited repairs or replacements up to the purchase value of the device.

#4. High Prices Across the Board

While the pros of T-Mobile phone insurance are clear, it’s impossible to ignore the company’s decidedly high prices across the board. T-Mobile phone insurance plans cost up to $18 plus tax per month. That means a three-year Protection 360 policy could cost over $720 with state and local taxes included. Add in service fees and deductibles of up to $225, and it’s a very costly proposition.

T-Mobile Phone Insurance Alternatives

Thankfully, T-Mobile customers don’t need to purchase Protection 360 or Device Protection to activate their other services. However, the brand does point out that, without protection, buyers may be responsible for the full replacement cost of their device if the worst happens.
To ensure that this isn’t the case, T-Mobile customers are advised to lock in an extended warranty or service contract from another provider. Various options are available, including manufacturers’ extended warranties and packages sold by big-box retailers and other third parties.
Two prime examples are AppleCare+ and Best Buy’s Geek Squad. Each boasts its own pros and cons. Access to Apple’s in-store Genius Bars is an obvious benefit of AppleCare+ coverage, for example. That said, it’s another expensive proposition and, of course, is only available to iPhone owners. Best Buy plans also have their own limitations. One of the best options for third-party protection is Upsie.

Save Up to 70 Percent With Upsie

By cutting out the middleman, Upsie saves customers more than two-thirds on the cost of all-important extended warranty coverage.
Upsie is now widely recognized as a disruptor in the traditional extended warranty market. In addition, coverage with Upsie is up to 70 percent less expensive than other options.
All Upsie smartphone warranty policies offer comparable or superior coverage to packages sold by manufacturers and big-box retailers. Benefits include comprehensive accidental damage protection, coverage for new and used devices, Genius Bar support with iPhone warranty plans, and more.
Best of all, Upsie’s set deductible is clear and doesn’t change. Additionally, Claims are unlimited up to a device’s purchase price. Find out more at Upsie.com.

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